Marc-André Hamelin – Press

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Reviews

Carnegie Hall Solo Recital

Two Pianists Offer Contrasting Paths of Exploration

by Anthony Tommasini The New York Times

October 25, 2019

“That Mr. Hamelin played [Scriabin’s Fantasy in B minor and Prokofiev’s Sarcasms] with technical dazzle and wondrous subtleties made the music seem even wilder.

…Mr. Hamelin conveyed [Feinberg’s Sonata No. 3’s] craziness while playing with scintillating colors and stress-free virtuosity.

After intermission came Schubert’s late Sonata in B-flat. So, after a trip to the Russian wild side, was he settling into a sublime classic? But there was nothing safe about the probing and eloquent performance he gave.”

Liszt's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Cleveland Orchestra

Cleveland Orchestra champions the overlooked with Hamelin, Slobodeniouk

by Zachary Lewis Cleveland Plain Dealer

October 25, 2019

“Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1 also can be problematic in the wrong hands. Luckily, on Thursday, the orchestra had what may be the two best hands in the business for the job: those of Marc-Andre Hamelin.

A strong and supremely gifted virtuoso, Hamelin brought to the concerto just the right combination of charisma, digital dexterity, and raw power.”

Recital at Kultur und Kongresszentrum Liederhalle in Stuttgart

Stuttgarter Nachrichten

by Frank Armbruster Stuttgarter Nachrichten

June 5, 2018

“…Hamelin showed that he is not only a master of concise form, but also knows how to handle large-scale sonata movements. Completely exposed, with a feeling heart, Hamelin embarked on soul exploration, which means this music, played the harmonious lighting changes with the greatest sensitivity. Depressed in the first two movements, inspired by cautious vigor then in the third and fourth movements. Great art.”

SCHUBERT Piano Sonata No 21. 4 Impromptus CD Review

by Paul Janssen Klassieke Zaken

June 1, 2018

“Hamelin is not interested in silent lyricism in these works from Schubert’s last year of life. He voices the fear, the despair, the changing moods that are also in the sonata and the impromptus. It makes this recording a very memorable and valuable addition.”

Feldman: For Bunita Marcus CD review

Feldman: For Bunita Marcus CD review – immaculate care with colour and nuance

by Andrew Clements The Guardian

July 27, 2017

“Marc-André Hamelin presents that world of microscopic nuances with immaculate care. There’s none of the impatience that characterised Ivan Ilić’s reading of For Bunita Marcus two years ago; everything in Hamelin’s performance seems part of a natural, inevitable unfolding, and the Hyperion recording perfectly catches all its details, and clouds of decaying sonorities that colour every silence. As Hamelin shows, the empty spaces in Feldman’s piano writing are as important as the pitches themselves.”

Recital at the Cleveland International Piano Competition

Marc-Andre Hamelin wins listeners’ hearts at Cleveland Int’l Piano Competition recital (review)

by Zachary Lewis The Plain Dealer

March 22, 2017

“Beethoven and Chopin were his two finest vehicles. The former’s ‘Appassionata’ Sonata and the latter’s Sonata No. 2 he crafted into journeys ranging from poignant to exhilarating. All one could do for most of their duration was sit back and submit to the musical equivalent of two hurricanes.”

CD Review: Debussy Images and Preludes

CD Review: Debussy Images and Preludes

Gramophone

November 21, 2014

“Marc-André Hamelin’s stature, extraordinary from the start, increases with every new issue. And here in his latest album he subdues his legendary, transcendent technique to convey Debussy’s very essence with a surpassing ease and naturalness… Hamelin’s glistening sonority is flawlessly captured by the Hyperion team. This is a disc to treasure.”

Schubert: Marc-André Hamelin CD review

Franz Shcubert – Piano Sonata D960 – Four Impromptus D935 – Marc-André Hamelin (Piano) – 034571282138 – Released: April 2018 – Hyperion CDA68213

by Jean-Yves Duperron Classical Music Sentinel

“Marc-André Hamelin does perceive Schubert as a delicate, lyrical, poetic lieder-meister musician. One might say like a gentle and naïve Beethoven. He lends the Sonata the precise amount of expressive coloration it needs to reveal its charms, and diverse phrasing to prevent ennui. The 22 minute opening movement of the sonata certainly benefits from that type of approach. And unlike Sviatoslav Richter for example, he avoids a heavy-hand in even the loudest passages, and maintains well-judged proportions at all times. The leading melody is always clear and articulate, whilst the other hand always provides the appropriate counterweight.”